In essence, the student organization at UM is organized "from, by, and for" students, but the functionaries are responsible to the university or faculty leaders, as the main person in charge and the person in charge of the faculty concerned. This student organization is intended as a vehicle and means of self-development for students towards broadening their horizons and enhancing their intelligence and personality integrity. Ormawa activities at university, faculty, and department levels are oriented towards increasing achievement.
According to the Rector of State University of Malang Number: 13 / KEP / UN32 / KM / 2012 of 2012, the student organization structure consists of Student Government Organization (OPM) and Student Non Government Organization (ONPM). OPM includes three levels, namely (1) University Level, consisting of the University Legislative Body (LLU), the University Executive Institute (LEU); (2) Faculty level, consisting of the Faculty Legislative Institute (LLF) and the Faculty Executive Institute (LEF); and (3) the department level is called the Department Student Association, while the Student Non Government Organization (ONPM) is a Student Activity Unit (UKM).
The status and functions of each level of student organization are as follows.

Student Government Organization (OPM)
The University Legislative Institution (LLU) which is also called the Student Representative Council (DPM) is a normative institution and the highest representative of ormawa within UM students, which is a non-structural institutional subsystem at the university level; functions as a formulator of norms, channeling aspirations, planning, establishing GBPK, and supervising the activities of ormawa in MUs, as well as formulating positive legal substances that are determined to maintain and enforce organizational norms and ethics.
The University Executive Institute (LEU) which is also called the Student Executive Board (BEM) is an executive institution and is a non-structural institutional subsystem at the university level; serves as the coordinator of student activities at the university level and implementing GBPK.
The Faculty Legislative Body (LLF) which is also called the Faculty Student Council (DMF) is a normative and highest representative institution in the faculty, which is a faculty level non-structural institutional sub-system; serves as a forum for communication, channeling aspirations, planners, GBPK settlers, and supervisors for student organization activities at the faculty level as well as formulating positive legal substances established to maintain and enforce organizational norms and ethics.
The Faculty Executive Board (LEF) which is also called the Faculty Student Executive Board (BEMFA) coordinates student activities and is a non-structural subsystem at the faculty level; serves as coordinator of student activities and implementer of GBPK at the faculty level.
The Department Student Association (HMJ) is an executive body of student organizations at the department level as the executor of student activity work programs in accordance with their department and is a non-structural institutional subsystem in the faculty; serves as a forum for describing, implementing, and developing student activities in accordance with the department and carrying out coordination and synchronization of student activities at the faculty level.
In accordance with the number of faculties at UM, there are 8 (eight) Faculty Legislative Institutions (LLF) and 8 (eight) Faculty Executive Institutions (LEF), while the Department Student Association is in accordance with the number of departments in the Faculty environment. concerned.

Student Non Governmental Organization (ONPM)
Student Non Governmental Organization (OPNM) is an organization that develops talents and interests outside OPM. In carrying out student activities, form a forum in the form of a Student Activity Unit (UKM). The number of SMEs in 2013 was 30 which were grouped into six fields, namely: (1) reasoning; (2) Arts Interest; (3) Interest in Sports; (4) Special Interests; (5) Welfare; and (6) Spirituality.

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